Growthpreneurs by Shanee Moret

Top 3 Sales Skills for Founders

November 26, 2022 Shanee Moret Season 4 Episode 16
Growthpreneurs by Shanee Moret
Top 3 Sales Skills for Founders
Show Notes Transcript

In this conversation, we answered the question, "What are the top 3 sales skills for founders?" The purpose of this conversation is to share, from experience, different perspectives that can help founders sell better, and make more money, so they can solve more problems. 

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Shanee´ Moret:

In today's conversation, we're going to be answering the question, what are the top three sales skills that have helped you in your experience? And then we're gonna be sharing practical strategies so that listeners can also increase or develop whatever top three skills that you share. I really want this conversation to be a resource for listeners and for let's say, non-sales, uh, leaders such as founders, um, people. In service based businesses, consultants that don't necessarily view themself as a salesperson, but require sales skills to obviously succeed. All right? So if you are going to come to the stage, make sure that you're ready to share the top three sales skills that have benefited you. So we're speaking just from personal experience because everyone has a different selling style, and I also want that to provide perspective and be a resource for the audience. So let's get started. So, Jace, in your opinion, Jace, first of all, tell people a little bit about who you are so that they get context and what you believe the top three sales skills. Are or have been for you?

Jayce Grayye:

Hey Shana, and thank you for having me here and hopefully everybody's having a great Wednesday right before Thanksgiving, so let's get into it. Right? Um, so, uh, as you know, I run a recruiting company. We recruit top sales talent across the globe for all of our clients. And I've been, before I got into this industry, before I got into this space, which all happened by accident. Prior to that I was a fractional VP of sales. I worked for Grand Cardone as one of the sales managers, and I did about corporate sales for about nine and a half years up until I decided to leave. So I've done car sales, medical sales, SAS sales, you name it. I've gone through my fair share of even of travel sales and when. Back at my accomplishments when I look back at what I made me, uh, pretty much a top performer everywhere I ever went to. I, I look back at how I decided to coach myself in sales and just pretty much sharpen that skill. So, uh, it's funny that you're talking about this because today I actually made a post regarding, uh, one of the, my favorite top sales skills. So, uh, what a coincidence that ended up to be. So for me, my top three sales skills are first qualifying, making sure you know how to qualify a potential customer, making sure that you know, you're talking to a qualified buyer. The second one would be negotiations. Um, there's a great book on negotiations by, um, Chris. On his end. Great book gives you a lot of analogies. There's never

Shanee´ Moret:

split the

Jayce Grayye:

difference. There we go. Never split the difference. And now there's another one that I love that dives deeper into, into that, that's called the Book of Real World Negotiations, where it's, uh, it's, I forgot who it's written by, but it's a yellow book. Great book. Gives you a lot of examples. Something out of like Bob Green, uh, Robert Green's, uh, storyline, right? And my third, which I think this one doesn't get enough credit for, for what it is, is humor. Using humor in your sales, using sales, humor, comedy to drop down your customer's gar. So for me here in this industry, I always wanted to have fun and humor allows me to have fun. So that to me, Shana are the three to me personally, most important skills when it comes to sales.

Shanee´ Moret:

All right, so let's go to the first one. Jay's Qualifying Prospects. If you're speaking to the audience, let's say the coaches and consultants, what's like one thing that they can do to qualify

Jayce Grayye:

prospects? Sure. So everyone has a different customer avatar, right? But everybody understands it. What? Everybody should have a clear idea of what that customer avatar is, what, where they are in their business, how much they should be generating. Pretty much you should have that idea. And when it comes to figuring out is this person a qualified buyer or not, is simply asking them where they are in their business, what have they done in the last three months in their business or where they, where they've done in the last three months. And then, Ask them what's the average sale that they're generating. And once you get the average sale, you figure out what they're averaging per month, which the last three months will give you that ideal number. And you know, the ticket size. That right there, when you start quantifying those numbers, it starts to add up. So I'll give you an example., let's say, you know, you're saying, Hey, Ja, you know, you know, we work with about an average, about five to 10 coaches every single our customers, every single month. We're naturally charging about 2000 per customer. That's you already off the bat. That's gonna be anywhere from about 10 to 20,000 in revenue. So now you ask yourself, is this your ideal customer avatar? You'll know based upon what you've worked with in the past, where they stand, and if this is, chances are, if this is your, your first time trying to close someone or trying to get them as a client, then you know, you're more on the tentative side of trying to provide as much value and as much as information and being transparent, sometimes you may have to drop your prices. However, once you figure out the average, then at that point you could just move forward and, and know that this person is a qualified buyer for you.

Shanee´ Moret:

So what this looks like in, you know, practical steps is like somebody maybe. Because for me, I wanna add a different perspective. For me, qualifying the prospect really happens in the content first, right? You could be strategic about what you say in your content so that it kind of filters out people so that they won't even make it to the form on your website or whatever, until they have certain qualities, right? So what, what Jace is talking about asking these questions is people may be landing on a landing page or, or a website and then you have certain questions so that you're not getting on the phone with a bunch of people that are not really ready to make the decision, uh, cannot afford or do not want to afford your service or your product, so on and so forth. So that's what qualifying a prospect means. I wanna like for people in the audience that may be. beginners at this. I wanna keep the lingo like super simple. And a prospect is someone that, a person that may be interested in what you sell that may turn into a client, right? So you don't wanna just get on the phone or whatever with anyone. You want to get on the phone with people that are the highest quality. Um, because if not, you're gonna burn out and waste a lot of your time. Like if you talk to 20 people and only one could potentially buy your thing, then you're gonna have to make a lot of calls versus three talking to three people and then one buys your thing. So this is why qualifying is very important. Um, is that right? Chase is the symptom of non qualification, just making a lot of calls.

Jayce Grayye:

Yeah, the thing is that you don't wanna be spending a lot of time with someone who's just gonna be a tire kicker, as they say. It's just gonna be wasting your time. So having those preset of questions up in front, right? And just simply saying like, Hey, you know, if you're stuck between 20 to about 30,000 and you're trying to go and do about a hundred thousand dollars a month, even that right there when you're running a promotion or uh, advertising, you're kind of pre-qualifying them in that sense, cuz you're letting them know if you're between here and here, that makes you a

Shanee´ Moret:

qualified buyer. Exactly. And, and a good way to think about this if you're like a very beginner, is to think about like, who do you not want to work with? So think about the opposite, right? Um, like for me, one of the qualifications is. How I pre-filter my content. I'm like, if you're not willing to create content, I'm not the person that can help you like go elsewhere, right? Because I can help you grow your business if you're willing to show your face and you know, willing to show up and build a personal brand. There are other people that could help you if you just wanna run ads or leverage other creators for ads or just hit people in the dms. But you could leverage your content to do a lot of this filtering and qualification as well. And then do even more qualification on the form. So, yeah, those are great. Jace, stay on stage. Um, Victoria, what's up? In your experience, what's the top three sales?

Victoria Jenn Rodriguez:

Hey, what's going on? I'm at the nail salon, so I hope it's not too loud, but thanks for having me here. Happy holidays, everybody. So my first top tip is that you have to create an emotional and text, uh, emotional connection with your audience, with your target market. And the best way for you to do that is to try your best, to eliminate the self doubt or the misconception that you created in your mind. That you need to be perfect and that you need to, you know, show like you have it all together all the time. Right now, people want to buy from people, right? And if you're able to emotionally connect with folks via your marketing, they're, you're going to attract them and they're gonna feel like, oh, I can relate to this person. I see myself in this person. Or, oh, I wanna learn more about this person. And once you're able to draw them in, it's much easier to call this close the sale. So I would say that would be the first tip. The second tip is to have a process around your sales.. A lot of people, they get people in, right? They get the lead, but once they get the lead, they're not nurturing them. They're not following up with them, they're not doing anything to drive the sale all the way home. And it is indeed a process, right? The old ways of, uh, locking in a sale are done and gone with. It takes much more effort and many more touchpoints in order to close a sale than ever before in history. A because people have a lot more options now, and B, consumers are just getting smarter about how they're spending their money, especially in this climate. And then the third tip that I would give is make the ask, right? You have. Tell people what it is that you have to sell. What is your offer? And make the ask and don't be shy about it and make sure that whatever your pricing structure is around that, that you go into the ask with full confidence and not feeling like you're too pricey or maybe you should offer a discount cuz Black Friday's around and you see everybody else doing it. Like really be connected to your product or your service and be confident in your pitch and it will help you close the sale. But you definitely have to make the ask in order for any money to come your way. I hope that was helpful.

Shanee´ Moret:

I love it. Thank you so much. And it's so true. What advice would you give to someone who is more introverted, maybe a new entrepreneur, and is afraid or chokes every time when they need to make the ask? I would

Victoria Jenn Rodriguez:

say practice makes perfect. Like you have to practice your pitch. Even if you have to stare, you know yourself in the mirror and just do it over and over again, it will help you build your confidence. And it's like the advice that a lot of folks give with your 92nd pitch or when you're in a elevator, make sure you have, you know, your pitch ready for when you're going in between floors. You never know if you might run into the CEO of somebody or just an opportunity. It's the same thing, but when you're trying to run the sale, you have to practice and you have to be comfortable with being uncomfortable. And I know that's cliche, I know that's way easier said than done, but we're all doing it right. Everybody who's successful is constantly doing things that A, they don't wanna do, and B makes them really

Shanee´ Moret:

uncomfortable. I love it. Thanks for sharing that. Sean. Car, what's up? What are the top three skills that have helped you sell? Yes.

Shankar Poncelet:

Uh, good morning everyone. My name is Shankar. I run a healthcare marketing agency out of San Antonio, and I have been able to grow it to a very nice size, um, with very subtle, uh, sales techniques. Actually. Uh, most of it, uh, is focused around building trust within niche audience. And I do that by, um, just, uh, being very consistent and present. And, uh, that works for. Online and offline. And I see a lot of inbound requests, so I, I do ask, but I only ask when I'm being asked to ask if that makes sense. And that is a strategy that works very well for me. So, uh, consistency and discipline are very high and, uh, it's just something that people, when they observe you and you are able to participate or partake, or contribute in a meaningful way, uh, consistently over a long period of time. That kind of inherently builds trust and is something that I have noticed, uh, people look at. So what I did, for example, is I joined an association, uh, that serves my target audience and I volunteered to be a chapter leader here in San Antonio. And then I just consistently put on events on their behalf. And, um, I really. Um, so that's kind of the second component is, uh, participation. So you wanna, uh, be consistent in showing up, but also be consistent in participating. And you wanna do that out of commitment and joy to, for the cause or for the field you are helping to build, cuz that makes it a lot easier and that makes your work really stand out. And then the third component is whenever you do something, wherever you do it, in this case, uh, being consistent and participating, do it, uh, with your highest, uh, level of quality possible. You really have to be a, a master in your skill set. Um, because that is of course how people will feel compelled to come towards you and to get that inbound request, if you will.

Shanee´ Moret:

And you, you sell on the phone. I'm sorry. And you close on the phone, is that what you're saying?

Shankar Poncelet:

Um, I usually close in, uh, zoom calls and, um, it is also very often a follow up email to said meeting and in my industry is very common to have like these elaborate proposals that you send off where you work hours and hours on making them look super slick. But, um, the best clients for me have resulted in having a, a meeting, usually an hour long meeting to understand what the needs are, and then sending a very simple email with like two or three lines. Okay, I understand what needs to be done. I propose X amount of dollars per month. Uh, and then we, we try, To do as best as we can. So, interestingly enough, that has worked best for me and we're talking, uh, sometimes $10,000 retainers. So, um, yeah, that's what

Shanee´ Moret:

works for me. I love it. And, you know, I'm asking these questions cuz I think the first thing to recognize is like, everyone has a different zone of genius and, and different strengths and different weaknesses. And I think that one of the biggest mistakes that people make in sales is to look at someone with a different complete set of strengths and weaknesses and then try to model that person. I think that you should try to model someone who's very successful in however selling, um, compliments your strengths and weaknesses. Right. Um, so yeah. Justin, do you wanna say something?

Justin Gillespie, LMSW:

Yes, yes. Good morning, Shana. How's everyone doing today? Good. Good. Awesome. So I wanna come in from maybe a different perspective. I don't know how many people are in here are in the healthcare industry, or maybe our therapists or social workers and things like that. But I think from our field, there's a lot of things that we've learned over the years of being in our profession and just things that we've learned in school that are very business and sales savvy. That we don't really think of as business or sales savvy. I mean, we have so many transferable skills. It's ridiculous. And I know so many social workers and so many therapists for their private practice who really just don't even know how to close on a consult call. And so my three tips, first thing I wanna say is, When you're in our industry and you're a therapist, or even, not even just if you're a therapist, but if you serve clients at the one on one level. So these are for my coaches out there, these are for, I don't know, um, my friend is an insurance, uh, broker. She sells things like that. So people at the one on one level. So the first thing that you need to do, you need to map out your actual specialty and make it more specific to who your ideal client is. So how I've done this is there's certain tools that we use in the therapy world. We use things like Psychology Today, which is like our profiles that we use. Um, I personally use social media. I've not a lot of clients do TikTok as well as Facebook groups and just, you know, telling my authentic story through there and things like that, which make people wanna work with me, right? So one of the things I've done is I've niche down my content. I've niche down my psychology today, I've niche down my website to the point where anytime I get a client that's calling me or emailing about, Hey, I might wanna work with you, and I've set them up with that 20 minute free consult call. Nine times outta 10, that person is going to be my ideal client and when I do my pitch to them in the consult call, nine times outta 10, they're gonna sign up with me. If I generate the lead, I already know they're a client. That's the first thing you need to do in our field. The second thing we need to do, we need to make the process of going from an inquiry to a actual client. You gotta make it seamless. So my general. Whenever I get somebody who is looking to be a client with me, um, I will follow up with 'em within 24 hours. Now how are we doing this exactly? Well, that goes back to rule number one. You wanna filter out the individuals who aren't gonna work with you. You could get 80 leads all day. You're not gonna be able to call back 80 leads a day. I maybe get two, three, maybe four or five leads a month. Um, when I go viral, I probably sometimes get 20 a month, which is nice. But pointing, I've narrowed down my search based on the content I'm producing, based on what I'm putting on my website. So that way it's not just general mental health, it's not. Me being a therapist, here's the 20 things I may be able to work with. But there's little subspecialties that you may or may not be able to work with. So for me, instead of saying I work with people with adhd, I've even taken that a step further and my marketing's toward children and families of children who have adhd. Um, and now I'm actually taking a strategy of ane not even further and looking in the six to age, six to 12 range, right? So you start narrowing that down more based on what you know to provide what you know how to do. It makes your life easier. It cuts down on leads that aren't gonna help you. It saves you time and you're able to follow up on those leads quickly. If you don't follow up on the queens, on the leads, quickly, doesn't matter what industry you're in, they're gonna forget they even contacted you. They've either found somebody else. they just forgot they even wanted this thing to begin with, so why would they call you back, right? Mm-hmm.. And so the other thing that I also do is a mindset trick. So my third tip is competition does not convey competence. Let me tell you. All right? Now, if you're an expert at what you do, if you are niche down, if you are the person that's providing this particular solution, there is no competition for you. So why should you have a lack of

Shanee´ Moret:

competence? I'd love it. And so let's, let's actually double down. I'm gonna ask a question to the panel, um, because I feel like a lot of people neglect that part of this sales process. You should be really identifying can you help this person and do you actually wanna work with this person? right? And you should have measures in place. Like if someone comes to me and then I quickly identify, like I had this guy, he called me and he's like, I'm on the phone with him. He's like, yeah, I own like 20 businesses. I wanna grow on LinkedIn. I'm like, I already know what type of person I'm talking to. I'm talking to somebody that just buys businesses and doesn't wanna show their face, right? And I'm like, well, are you willing to build a personal brand? And he's like, no, I'm kind of behind the scenes guy. I'm like, well, let me refer you to someone that could help you grow through, you know, just dms, just pure outreach instead of actually sharing content. Right? Uh, because I can't help you.. I just saved his time and I saved my time. So I think that having referral partners in place for when you can't help that person and being very transparent about it, and then, uh, having referral partners in place to maybe you identify some things like morally and ethically that you may not wanna work with this person. Right? Like I was on a call with a founder and she was like, this one thing made me not wanna work with her. She was complaining because a customer was texting her about a complaint. She's like, Ugh, I can't stand this customer. They're always texting me and complaining. I almost said, maybe you, what are they complaining about? Like, maybe you should take it as a learning lesson and fix the process or the product instead of trashing your customer on the phone with a complete stranger. And so that, that type of character trait, I was like, Nope, you're out. Right, and I referred her. So as someone like when you are, especially if you're something like a coach consultant, I feel like sometimes that empathy and that care can get in the way of like looking at certain things in sales, you have to, number one, identify, can I even help this person? And don't lie to them because that's just gonna destroy your reputation if you take them on and can't help them. And then number two, have referring partners in place for when you don't want them as a client. So let's talk about this. So

Victoria Jenn Rodriguez:

Shana, it's Victoria, so don't what? What I always advise people is don't be so thirsty for like a check. Mm, that you go ahead and risk your integrity right within your business because to your point, your reputation, once it's tarnished, especially in this culture of like cancel culture, it's so easy for people to literally put their feedback and their 2 cents about you and their experience with you online, and you don't want that to, um, become a domino effect. So the best way to avoid that is to be honest with yourself. And even though you might be struggling and you're looking for that next check, you're thinking about payroll or whatever it is, try to train yourself up where you have that referral base to your point so that you can just maintain your business integrity because that will bring you a bigger check in the long run versus you trying to collect these baby coins in the moment because you're stretched and you feel under pressure.

Camille Jones:

I love that. Can I, can I add to it if I may? Yeah. I love what you said there, Victoria, cuz. So, hi, my name's Camille. Hope I, I trust everyone's doing well. This winning Wednesday. I

Shanee´ Moret:

am a well, oh my God, now it's winning Wednesday. No friend,

Camille Jones:

no. Please know I have a, a name for everything you get. You're, you're learning it. You're learning it. And what I do is I am a wellness coach. I encourage your busy women in business to learn, to prioritize living a healthy life, to regain their confidence and energy without sacrificing time and their lifestyle. I have, where my success comes from is again, what you guys were talking about earlier, about pre-qualifications. So what I do is when I do have on my send out my calendar, I have a series of question. That are gonna qualify if they are willing or they're ready to take that next step. You know, if they're committed to understand, for them to understand that it's an investment, especially in the industry that I'm in, the first thing people think about is weight loss. Weight gain, when there's so many more factors to your overall wellness than just that part. And they will say, well, I could just go on YouTube for free, or I could do a $10 a month program. Of course you can, and I'm so proud of you. So absolutely you can do that. I always ask them, but if you, if you could do it, why are you not doing it? But I also qualifies me to see how much. That they are willing to invest in themselves. So do I need to even go on a sales call with them before they even book the call? So I have a series of questions about their commitment, their accountability, their past, what they're looking to achieve. And of course to understand that this is not a fly by, this is a full blown lifestyle program. So that's the first thing I do. The second one, and it's through my content, well this is the first I should say rather because it's my content that gets them there, is I truly hound down on authenticity, know, letting them see that I was once where they were. So I really do show my story and who progress through my content. So it could be relatable cuz you know, I'm a busy mom of three. I own a brick and mortar here in Toronto, plus I do the online and I still have time to love into. Unapologetically, and this is what I show. So that really has helped, like, that has actually catapulted my business is really showing my raw, authentic self. When I initially was doing content, I was being very generic. Now, I, I'm, I, I want, I'm, I purposely make them homegrown and I've gotten a lot of, um, Response from that. And then the third sales skill that I would say that I do is that there, I always say to people, there's, there's, I think I wrote it earlier, there's fortune in the follow up. I definitely will look at old leads or, you know, something that may have come, come by or, or, you know, may have been missed. And I really do retrack it and revisit it because there's a lot of, uh, times that we never know, especially in the industry that I'm in, maybe it wasn't the right time for them at that moment and they could have forgotten. So I fall, I follow right back up and I've, I've had a how

Shanee´ Moret:

do you do that walk? Uh, walk us through how you follow up, because people follow up in different ways. So I want the audience to see a few ways that people can follow.

Camille Jones:

Absolutely. So with my follow up, I have their email, so they're already part of my email list. So knowing the fact that they have not unsubscribed, which means that they're still accepting my emails and that they're still in the loop, that's the first and foremost cuz I don't wanna call anybody who's unsubscribed me or is completely off the Richter scale. So I do take note on that, who's still staying on the email list. Um, that's the first and foremost. I will definitely send out a soft email, which I did, which reminds me, thank you very much. I have to do, I'm in the process of sending some out this afternoon. Um, I would start with a soft email and uh, a few days later I do do a, a phone call. A just a call. Just a, just to say how everything's doing. You know, we're coming up to the end of the year, of course. I want to make sure that you are the first, you know, I, I make them feel special, like I'm coming out with a new program and there's a new offer, there's a new service I would want, I wanna make sure that you know about it before I send it out to even more people, because you have already stayed committed to getting my, my, my emails or my. Content. So I really make them feel special in that promotion or that new why we need to get in this call because we need to make sure that you're taken advantage of these opportunities while they're still hot and fresh before anybody else. So I really do show that, you know, That value to them. But

Shanee´ Moret:

I love this. Love that. I love it. So let's, I wanna, um, open the question to the stage Tomaso. I know you're here, and Michael, feel free to chime in. Um, what, like, yeah, go ahead. Tomaso, what three skills?

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

No, no, go ahead. If you're No, you go, you go. Question. I can jump in. No, I very briefly, um, I, uh, I'm working on a totally different industry as you know. Um, I'm in the mining industry, not the Bitcoin mining, but the real mining, oh my gosh. Different story., Justin Gillespie, LMSW: um,

Shanee´ Moret:

uh, Toma Tomasos saying I do real business on a big level. No,

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

because it's frustrating when I say, oh, I'm the money company. Oh, you do Bitcoins. Real mining anyway. Um, the reason why I'm saying that because my industry is very particular and I think that all the points that, uh, um, Camille, um, share and everybody else in the panel and yourself are super important. However, I think that the approach, um, is slightly different, uh, about the topic, today's topic between a business to business, a business to consumer. In my case, business to business is extremely capital intensive. So I want to chime in. I don't want to take too much of your time, but I

Shanee´ Moret:

on the second we wanna learn from you.

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

Well, I mean, I have a lot to learn from everybody, but, um, I can share something I think unique because, uh, for example, as you know, um, in my industry it's, uh, I'm trying to, uh, promote, uh, a very, very expensive, uh, innovation solution for sustainable mining. So going back to vetting the customer and, uh, uh, understanding if a customer is a good fit for you and if it's a borderline legitimate, it's a part of the inbound of any of our customer for two reasons, primarily. One, because yes, there is an issue of reputation. Two, because we don't work with the illegal mining. And third, because my industry is extremely regulated. So there is also a regulation on, uh, in place. So clearly, uh, I'm not going to work with the project, uh, uh, of what we call artisanal minors that due to little bit maybe of ignorance. They, I dunno, treat gold with mercury. Then they dump the mercury in the river. For example, I was there in South America this week in x, she and Santiago working for big mining projects. And there was a segment of one project approaches that was not feasible, was not, let's say, uh, good for our business model. So in terms of, uh, the importance of vet a customer and link to your reputation, I find it extremely important to, uh, vet your customer because, uh, it doesn't pay. It doesn't pay at all. Uh, the damages on your reputation are much higher than a lousy check for even a million dollar doesn't pay. So that's, uh, chime in on that part, the first part instead. Uh, the first couple of question about some techniques. Uh, I think that one major skills that, uh, we try to perfect because we, uh, provide a complex engineering solution for us is to bring down a concept into minimal terms to use a mathematical expression. So I'm an apply mathematician originally, then a mining engineer, but uh, um, in a play mathematics one, my professor will. If you are able to express a complex mathematical project to a six years old, then you understood your project and your product or whatever you're working on. So, um, and you know that because me and you were working on a project, and one thing that my marketing team was amazed is when you outline your idea for the project you're working on, and you were extremely clear in your message and extremely simple, your project proposal, uh, anybody was able to understand it. So I think that to chime in on one topic that has been touched on the previous set of question, I think that simplicity is one of the thing that makes it, uh, very successful. So those are the two things that I was wanted to share with you up to this point, but great topic as usual. So

Shanee´ Moret:

that's, I love that. I love that tomaso and stay on stage and, and share and chime in whenever you can. So, One thing, Tama. So like what process, how do you vet that prospect instead of just believing them at face value?

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

So, uh, as I said, in my industry, we are lucky in a sense because it is extremely regulated. So when we have a, an inbound on a mining project, first of all, uh, there is a entire classification on mining project due to that. Some agency specifically do. And there is a classification between, uh, legitimate sustainable mining or mining companies and what we call artisanal minor. I don't want to open up an entire bowl of wax because a very complex process, project, or discussion or a topic. But unfortunately in the world, uh, the one that make the most damage are the artisanal minor and artisanal mining. Typical is done by local. Unfortunately, natives that, uh, uh, they see, uh, the appealing or extracting precious minerals like, uh, can be gold, silver, the most common, but also nowadays, uh, um, lium and whatever, uh, wheat processes that are artisanal. So basically for that example, if you go to sine or Amazon is a geographical area that is high risk on the mining classification projects. Why? Because most of the miners are artisanal minor that, for example, extract, extract gold with what is called amalga, which is the use of mercury. And, uh, they, they literally mix, uh, the alluvial, uh, gold, what we called doesn't require any specific process. It's already available, but then you gotta, uh, mix it with the mercury in order to extract it. And, uh, eventually cyanide. But, uh, everything is done. In other words, manually. So literally they mix the amalgam by hand, creating a massive issues in their own health, and then they throw, uh, the market in the Amazon River creating a major disaster. So clearly that kind of project is out of our radar locally. Uh, mining industry is very regulated. So the first step is for us to check is this money company legit? Is the project legit where the founding comes from? What are the board, uh, of advisor member coming from? What are the steps in the mining, uh, process that, uh, the project is at? Is a green free project, is a senior, mine is a junior mining and so, so forth. So to make it short, there is, uh, there are some standard process that that outlined by industry standard regulation. And of course we have an entire legal team that evaluate, uh, visibility projects and all the nine yards and of course engineering and so on and so forth. So it's, uh, typically. We're lucky because most of our clients are massive mining company. The world is owned by an full of massive mining companies. They own several projects around the world, and, uh, therefore even in their case, they are more than happy to share all the documentation, uh, in order to, uh, become clients. And they are very proud of showing that they are actually a sustainable type of mine and so on, so forth. So, and then of course you have the secondary mind in the recycling. Similar thing, uh, also every regulator. So the first step is all the legal and due diligence, um, set by the industry. And the second step also is the match of mentality. Not every customer is in line with our philosophy. So, uh, it's similar on the automotive industry. Not every customer is open to buy a Ferrari or is open to buy a Tesla. So I don't have to convince, I have to convince the customer, but sometimes. The customer is not good for me, and it's perfectly fine to say no. So then there is another inbound to see if we are aligned in terms of, uh, uh, company's idea and company's way of doing things. So those are the two pillars

Shanee´ Moret:

in Inbound. I love that. Thank you so much for sharing Tomaso and stay on stage to participate. Um, Michael, what's up? Do you wanna share?

Michael Omeka:

Absolutely. Hi. Um, hey. Yeah, so I, I'm Michael. I'm a consultant and a fitness specialist, and I think what I've been hearing so far has been, um, it's, I've been taking a lot of notes. It's, uh, thank you everyone for sharing, first of all.

Shanee´ Moret:

But Michael has 10 pages of notes. No, I'm just kidding.. . Michael Omeka: Um, yeah, I think just just said, I think the first skill. For sales, it's to understand the product, like the back of your hand, whatever product or service you are offering. If you don't understand it, if you are not excited about it, if you don't know the ins and out, why should someone else, you know, if you don't care, why should don care? You know, if, if you that you're selling the product, you don't really give two shits about it. Like why should a stranger care? So I think understanding the product and service that you are offering, that is the first critical component of any sales process. And I, I, I think that. Actually comes off like when you are in the source process. Cause I used to sell, like I used to work for, um, Equinox and I would sell fitness programs. And I, I realized that the, the, the, the easier cells, the cells that almost saw themselves, where those cells that I was, you know, feeling very energetic, feeling very excited, feeling very enthusiastic. And the client can tell, they can tell, you know, 95% of all communication is nonverbal. So the client is looking at you, they're looking at your eyes, they're looking at your push. They're, they're, they're high brain. They're, they're Olympic brain. It's registering all this information that you are not necessarily aware of. And so just being very, very cognizant that the, it's an entire process. I think that helps a lot. Um, like, uh, but Einstein said, if you cannot explain it to a five year old, You probably don't understand it yourself. So I think that's the first component for me. And then the second component is active listening. Most times, like we, we go into this source process and we, we have our own preconceived notions of what the client wants. Um, we may have sat down, um, created a perfect avatar, done all this work, but when in the sales process, if you are not actively listening, like you could be talking about Florida and your client wants something in New York City, like, like it can be, it, it's, it's don't sell steak to someone who says they want chicken

Michael Omeka:

Exactly. Like, why are you trying to sell steak? I'm a vegan. Come on now. Um, yeah. So taking at like paying attention to what the client is saying, Really, really, really helps. And I think one way, and we've been talking about vetting, about vetting, about vetting, one way about, um, to understand the client's needs in my experience is to ask is to, is to go deeper. Like find what is motivated. And for example, I have a client sitting in front of me and they're like, oh yeah, you know, it would be loose to, it would be nice to lose 20 pounds before summer. I'll be like, well, why do you wanna lose 20 pounds? Well, you know, I, I, I, it will help me become healthier. Well, why is it important to become healthier? Um,

Shanee´ Moret:

Um, I need a good Instagram photo.. I'm just kidding.. Michael Omeka: And you know, like Shaneel, client, they have a vacation coming up in the summer somewhere in The Bahamas, and they really wanna take those nice Instagram photos. Exactly. There's the honesty . Yeah. And, and it may

Michael Omeka:

sound vague, it may sound, you know, like it's hubris, but it is the motivator. And if you, as the salesperson cannot uncover that on the line motivation, most times the client will be like, well, let me, let me talk to my spouse about it. Well, let me think about it. And, you know, most times, I mean, fortune is in the follow up, like can said earlier, but if you can close that deal right there and then it makes no sense to like, you know, dwell on it. You know, you wanna, you, you wanna strike while the iron is hot. So that's the second tip. And then I, the third tip for me, the third, um, skill for me would be selling an outcome. Um, like if someone wants to hire me to help them get in shape, I will not be, you know, selling, um, um, the workout itself because they can get any trainer. In fact, they can get it on YouTube. In fact, most times I ask them, you know, like, you can literally, there's no workout that you want right now that you cannot get on YouTube or get on the internet. So, So there is something you bring to the table that is irreplaceable and that is yourself. And I think once you understand that you are here to contribute, you are here to help, it makes it much, much more easier. And then when you are selling outcomes, it's like, well, how will you feel after you've achieved this goal? And when they tell you, and then you are like, well, why can't you achieve that goal? Because they can go Google out the workout program they want in the world. They can go Google, you know, whatever they want. But what I bring to the table, it's experience, it's insight, it's understanding it's years and years and years of study. So I think being able to articulate those, those outcome in a very, very concise, you know, keep it simple, keep it stupid, simple case, um, that, that will help, uh, tremendously. It's my go out.

Shanee´ Moret:

I love that. And, and then you could leverage, you know, like what they share with you. Like if someone's like, oh my God, I just, I really wanna get in shape cuz I'm going on this vacation in the summer and I wanna take all these pictures and we hired a professional photographer, then it's like, you could take that and do a post about like, Hey, do you wanna have abs by summer? you know, to crush your Instagram photos. You know, , uh,

Michael Omeka:

absolutely. Um, and sometimes they, they'll tell you, oh, I have a wedding coming up and I want to look the best. I want to be in the best shape ever. So I fit in this dress. Sometimes it's an older client, oh, my grandkids, you know, they're coming around and I don't, I can keep up with these kids. They just run around and need more energy. So we're helping them develop energy systems. So it's like, They're, they're just getting, if you can get the motivation behind why they're trying to do what they're doing, it makes the process significantly, um, um, uh, seamless.

Shanee´ Moret:

I love it. If you, if you have a question in the audience or want some advice when it comes to sales in your business, maybe you wanna start a business, maybe you're struggling or just need some kind of perspective in your current business, um, raise your hand so that we could potentially pour into you. Um, alright. So have. Jayce Grayye: Yeah. Is it okay if I talk about, real quick about following up? I know Camille kind of went over it, but I kind of wanted to describe like a couple of golden nuggets here, cuz that's something I really specialize in. Yeah, and, and you do it on the phone, I'm assuming. So she gave a perspective for emails. So, go ahead, Jake. Yeah.

Jayce Grayye:

Yeah. So I, I do this on the phone, I do this in person, I do this on Zoom, so it doesn't necessarily matter, but any time I'm following up with, when I'm following up with any customer, I think what kind of prevents us is like, everybody thinks there's a certain way of following up. There's a black and white way of following up, which in reality, the best way of following up is just being creative. So I'll go ahead and provide some contents here so you guys can understand where I'm coming from. I'll never forget that some of my best sales came from me. Just literally ordering weather fills, Papa Johns Dominoes, pizza Hut, any pizza parlor that was nearby their office, I would tell them I would place an order, send it to the main person that would be there. I would tell them to remove a slice, and I would tell them that I'm I, I have the missing piece to their success. Literally, I would tell the, I would tell the parlor shop, the pizza parlor shop to write that inside the, the box. So when they open the box and they read, I have the missing piece to your success, and they see that there's a missing pizza, they would, they would have fun. They, they would have, they would, they would crack a joke. It would be as simple as ordering Starbucks, cappuccino, cappuccino, whatever they'd like, would order it to their office, letting them know, Hey, Jace, uh, dropped this off for you guys. Or, it was simple as ordering either an artwork, socks because it was whatever it was. The thing about following up is that there's no black and white weight, and the more you, you study who your customer is and you spend the time knowing what they'd like, I'll never forget, the most expensive thing I ever did on a follow up was I spent over $500 on a canvas that was. To the person's home. And I realized that the, I realized right after that that I didn't have the home address, so I had to send it to their office. And then I, I also send them this huge book. It was, and it was just the guy I knew, the guy liked history. So for me at least any single time it came to following up, I wasn't doing the typical, Hey, you know, it's just following up. I would be going it from a different avenue where they would not suspect it. And that's what made me very dangerous when it came to following up with, uh, clients.

Shanee´ Moret:

Yeah, I think in your follow up process, you have to think to yourself like, whatever you do, you have, what you do in your follow up has to prove that you were paying attention and that you actually care. What they care about. So for example, in Michael's, uh, example of like the Instagram apps, like he could, he could, uh, follow up with a picture of his client, but he could like Photoshop like a six pack, right? And then he could send it to the client and be like, you know, can't wait to help you get that six pack for, uh, for the upcoming summer. So you could crush it in your Instagram videos. Doing something like that, like shows that he was paying attention and then now you're speaking the language of what they care about, right? Because it's just what is their goal? You have to speak through that language. And so when you're following up, it should not just be like a generic script because then it's, they're gonna feel that, oh, this person says this to everybody. You have to prove in your follow up that you are paying attention to what's important to. And that, and that obviously requires active listening and some level of creativity, but it doesn't always have to require money. Right. In, in the example that I just shared. So, Laquita, what's up? Uh, do you have a question? How can we help you?

Unknown (Latika):

Um, no ma'am. I was, um, you mentioned if, um, there was someone who wanted to, um, ask questions more about

Shanee´ Moret:

how to start. Yeah.

Michael Omeka:

Um,

Unknown (Latika):

basically I really don't know. I, I know my niche is, but I really don't know how to start. I don't know, um, which way to go cuz I don't, I don't have anything to sell. I just know what I'm good at doing.

Shanee´ Moret:

Okay. Okay. So what are you good at doing? Um,

Unknown (Latika):

babysitting children and

Shanee´ Moret:

I'm good at cooking. Oh, well those are two things that are much needed., right? Like, I mean, oh my gosh. Okay. So, um, which one? You are hired. I know, right? You're hired . Um,

Unknown (Latika):

I got a connection with kids. It's just, it's

Shanee´ Moret:

awesome. Which one do you get complimented on? Most of people are like, oh my gosh. Even people that know you or are your friends?

Unknown (Latika):

Um, the children. Okay. I, um, cook and my kids be like, oh mom, this is so good. I be like, oh, wow. I need to be getting those, that excitement from other people, you know? You know? Mm-hmm.. So it's just, I'm good at both, but I think I can connect with children more. You know, I wanna do a podcast where, you know, parents are getting off of work and, you know, they have to fix dinner and stuff. And so I could be reading, you know, a short story to them or, you know,

Shanee´ Moret:

keeping them occupied into the, damn, this sounds good, . I need you . So, um, yeah. So what, why do you think you're so good with kids that like other people may not have, um, naturally,

Unknown (Latika):

because, you know, it's always like someone else can, you know, um, get to your, you know, kids better than you, you know, it's not that we are not good parents, it's just that patience and, you know, someone else trying to explain to them, you know, like one. Someone came through McDonald's, you know, I'm a retired vet, so I just wanted to do something. And so, um, I, um, was, uh, working in the drive through and a parent came in, she looked like she was in a fiat and her son was over there just pouting. And I spoke to him and she was like, wow, how did you do that? And I was like, I just got that in me, you know, I'm just good like that. So I just, I just kind of get on their level, you know, sometimes we have to do that. Mm-hmm. and I really know how to

Shanee´ Moret:

do that. Yeah, you could do a lot. Go ahead, Samma. So go ahead. No, I

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

was saying, uh, clearly not my field whatsoever. Uh, we covered this topic already, another, another of your podcast regarding parenting and stuff like that. So I don't go, I don't want to get there. But, um, I heard that you are, uh, um, former vet. Yes. I guess, right? Yes. So I think that, uh, you should learn how to use your look inside your resume, uh, look inside your strength points and uh, uh, sell your strength points. Certainly to me as a parent, knowing that. Somebody that can help me out and pass out me and my wife is a vet is an add on point. Because in this nowadays the society, all the security issues with all the, it makes, makes most people, I think, comfortable knowing that you are a vet, right? I mean, it's, that's sadly on point. Um, I think that your profile picture, uh, looks very, uh, comforting, inviting. So I think that, I'm not an expert. Sha definitely knows way more than me, but uh, uh, in terms of, uh, I think it says a lot when you sell. Your strength because uh, parents are very, of course protective. So when they look for care and they're proud to become a member on the family, right? So you become a team member with the parents. So that's something to take, that has to be taken very seriously. So I think that you should look into your strength point to emphasize the trend point, the vet that, because you said, oh yeah, I'm a vet, but no, you should said, I am a vet, like convinced because it's a huge plus in my opinion. Thank you. So even the way that you send a message

Shanee´ Moret:

mm-hmm. Yeah, that's that when you said that as a mom, it like perked my ears up too because just, you know, there's certain morals and character that comes and, and like Tomaso was saying, if you were at home with my kid, maybe you would know more what to do in case there was like a break in or an emergency or something like that. So that is a strength point. Um, I think like what you just shared, you just have to start sharing some of your stories. Like, hey, one time I went to McDonald's and I saw this little boy and he was really, really getting frustrated. His mom seemed overwhelmed. I just went to, and I, I thought that I could help them. So I went to him and I told him, Hey, cheer up, or I don't know what you said to him. And then the mom was really grateful. And if you're a parent, this is something that you can do. I think also sharing like tips for parents, right? Like how to entertain your kids while you have a zoom. Right. How to entertain your kids while you're cooking dinner. Um, how you realize certain types of, oh, this kid loves to paint versus this one loves to dance. Like how you identify their gifts and, and like plan fun time around what they love to do, right? And where it's not just babysitting. I think that the main thing a parent wants to know is that their kids not just in front of a tv, like being babysat, they're doing fun things and they're like, you know, they're safe and they're building a relationship. Maybe learning in the process with you where you're like a teacher, a mentor, and a babysitter in one. Does that make sense? I like that. Justin, you wanna go?

Justin Gillespie, LMSW:

Uh, first things first. This is gonna take some research and whatnot, but I want you to go on Facebook later. I want you to research what local Facebook groups are in your area. So, so I saw that it looks like you, you were in San Antonio, or you, uh, went to school in San Antonio. I couldn't remember which, but you're gonna look up like your city and basically just look up any Facebook groups that have to do with this. Now the navigation process of this is gonna be tricky cuz there are certain Facebook groups that'll let you just plug. And there's certain Facebook groups that want you to add content. Most are gonna want you to add content into it. So what I want you to do this week is I want you to either think of your greatest accomplishment with children or your most rememberable accomplishment with children, or think of a time that you had a babysitter that either went really, really good or really, really bad. Listening to that idea in general, I want you to then take that idea. I want you to break that down into 16 different, smaller stories that you can make into a Facebook, uh, post. So that way you're posting these once a week. If you write all 16 of these out at once, you have 16 weeks worth of content that you're posting in these three groups once a week to where people are gonna refer to you, people are gonna see your story and you're gonna create emotional connection. Yeah.

Shankar Poncelet:

I'm in San Antonio, laquita and there's a Facebook group called Sylo shirts. One community is a very strong community, and as you know, uh, a lot of veterans and military living there, they have, uh, on Wednesdays they have what is called a business day. And you are allowed to promote your business. And I can guarantee you if you post a nicely structured post there, um, according to what Justin told you, you'll have plenty of the man there.

Unknown (Latika):

Okay, thank

Shanee´ Moret:

you. You're welcome. Me later if you want. Yeah. Message Sean car cuz uh, he's also local, so, um, yeah, but I hope that that helped you. Did that help you a little bit? It did. Sean Car? Yeah, Sean. Uh, he's the one with the glasses Well on like yeah, you'll see his name right there. Okay, I

Unknown (Latika):

see Justin. And, and it's not Jace, right?

Shanee´ Moret:

No. and Sean Carr. You see Sean Carr?

Unknown (Latika):

Uh, normally you have us up there at the top when we're getting ready to speak. It's

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

Nio. He's on your left.

Unknown (Latika):

Pn. L e t. Okay.

Shanee´ Moret:

Yes, I'll see him. Okay. Awesome. Thank you so much Laquita, Regine, reg and thank

Uknown:

you. Um, I'm Regine. I'm in Montreal, and I just started a business in hair extension while I have

Shanee´ Moret:

Congratulations. Thank you.

Uknown:

It's free division. Um, well, I have three parts of the business. First I started with the hair extension and then, um, now I'm servicing clients that are experiencing hair loss. And my next one after January will be teaching. Um, what I'm kind of lost with is content, content and getting out there and having more people on my chair. I do have clients, but I feel like it's not on a regular basis. Mm-hmm.. Um, and I'm, I think everybody that gave their pointers here that says, um, one. Spoke and said, like, to make sure that the client is really, um, your niche. The, the, I think you guys said the, um, avatar. The avatar client. Mm-hmm.. I'm still struggling with that because extensions are not, um, it's like a, it's a luxury service. It's

Shanee´ Moret:

not, it's not a needed. You have, do you have extension clients right now? I do. I do. Okay. So the best way for me to guide you to like who your avatar is, is think about the client that has paid you the most money with the least amount of resistance that you actually enjoyed working with, and. Don't. Uh, one of the biggest things that we sometimes do when we're starting is we think that their character traits or what they do for work or whatever, is just a coincidence. And so if like you think of your best client and, um, you know, she's a busy entrepreneur, that's a mom, like, that's a sort of framing and beginning of like your avatar, because sometimes people form an avatar and it looks completely different to the data of who's paying them the most with the least resistance. Okay. So just which client do you love working with that has paid you the most with the least amount of resistance and you wanna get more people like her or him? Okay. Okay. Okay. Uh,

Jayce Grayye:

yeah, Shana, mind if I jump in here

Shanee´ Moret:

real quick? Yeah, go ahead.

Jayce Grayye:

Yeah. So, uh, Regina, I actually have a, a funny story here on this. So my barber. About 10 years ago went from cutting my hair to becoming a hairstylist and he now just does extensions, he does color change, all that stuff. But a lot of the money that he does does come from extensions. So I could, from just talking with him, I know how easy it is to like to charge for that. Mm-hmm., what he normally does is that he primarily focus on just posting a lot of his content on ig and when it comes to content, he's just simply doing before and after. Before what the hair look, you know, before the hair extensions and then after. Right. And then in between what he's doing, he's also capturing the video of the process Okay. Of how he was able to do that. And what's funny is that he's bald. He went from a barber to like cutting ha uh, doing extensions and he literally makes what he would make in three months of cutting hair and off of maybe a few clients and he decides his hours. So I know it's a very lucrative feel for you.

Uknown:

Yes, thank you. And now, like I said, I've niche because my why when I started this business, because I've experienced hair loss over the last couple years. Mm-hmm., and it hit the hardest last year, um, 2021. And I was looking for a new way, a way to cover, you know, to cover the air loss. And, and then I discovered, um, micro links, but at the bottom of it, it just, it didn't solve my hair loss, right. My hair was still falling off. I had extension beautiful. But, you know, once I remove it, my hair's still falling. So now that I've niched into hair loss and helping people with hair loss, it's just, I, it's two different things. It's just, I wanna tell the public that if you, it's two different services, but basically it's when a person comes see me that doesn't need to qualified, have extension, they, they need to have optimal scalp help and hair help to have. So when I don't, I'm able to help them too with the hair loss. It's just, I don't know how to present it. on Instagram or Facebook?

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

Uh,

Shanee´ Moret:

should I, go ahead. Go ahead, Tama.

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

Um, I speak in English. Okay. Uh, yes. My wife is from Montreal, so that's why. Um, but uh, so I speak a little bit of English. She'd have to understand there, um, but not enough to understand

Shanee´ Moret:

everything. So that's problem. He has selective understanding,. Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c): That's why. So we're very successfully married, I guess. Um, so, uh, one thing I was going to, uh, to chime in is turn on my field but's fascinating to me. So I will, um, we discussed before about the importance maybe of a referral programs. Mm-hmm., so definitely is something that I will consider. Um, uh, if you have a successful customer. I mean, a customer is very epic, clearly is, uh, referral product could go a long ways, I think. And, uh, uh, the other thing, I believe that your service are, uh, extremely, uh, important from a social perspective. We know many people that have, uh, air loss issue, including myself, as you can see from my beautiful profile picture. But I gave up so I'm not the right candidate. But, uh, uh, there are many other people that have other issues that, uh, needs actually to feel better, extension and stuff like that. So I will also leverage on the social kind of responsibility of your job. When it comes to a social media message. Okay. Social. That's very important, I think.

Uknown:

Okay. So

Shanee´ Moret:

Billy, thank you. Thank, yeah. And I, and I think that like just also doubling down with how you differentiate, right? So, you know, um, , my mom's hair stylist goes to her house. So I don't know if you do that, especially if they, you know, have hair loss and they feel a certain type of way about going outside, um, the quality of the hair extensions that you buy, right? Because I have a lot of friends that buy hair extensions and stuff, and I know that the quality of them matters. And sometimes they'll wait like a few months just to buy like the right thing and it's not cheap, right? Mm-hmm., um, I think like how you treat your client needs to be shared. Like, do you, do you be like, oh, sit down, let, let's go through this and like rush it. Or do you have like, you know, water tea waiting there for them? Like, do you make it fun? Um, I would also make it like a fun process where it influences that they want to share on Instagram. Like, Hey, I'm here with my hairdresser, because that's gonna be part of like, indirectly promoting you. Okay. Okay. Does that make sense? Yes, it does.

Uknown:

Definitely. But yes, they do have an experience when they do one little thing. My little secret is , well, I'm saying live, but, uh, my client spend a whole day with me doing air extension, like six to eight hours. They get a menu two days prior to the visit and get, and they get lunch. I

Shanee´ Moret:

love that. But if I'm on social and you don't tell me that, then I don't know how you're different. Right. And like maybe for your clients, it's not like, Hey, you don't have an extension appointment. You have an extension day. You know, spend the day with Regine because you're exclusive and you're, you know what I mean? Instead of, because a lot of these hair places, they'll, they'll overbook and then they'll try to push you out the door.

Uknown:

No, I don't do that. It's a one on one. Very have a little nook.

Shanee´ Moret:

Exactly. So like I would take a piece of paper, all of these little differentiation points that you do differently. Uh, and, and that's the advantage that you have now, right? Is when you're smaller, when you, let's say, want more clients now. Like your thing is that you can't take everyone, but they're gonna be so treated so well because it's so exclusive. That's what you want that perception to be. And then when you have a bigger demand, you know, you can have like maybe a more scalable process, but for now, that's your biggest differentiation and advantage and I would charge accordingly. Okay. Okay. Perfect. And then your other question of how to sell, you know, like ongoing treatment for like, you know, hair loss with it. Yes. I would just take it like you need to have an offer. That's the easy. Right. Like they may know that they need all the long term, like kind of like with Michael, right? Everyone knows that they need to be healthy, but they, what they really want first is to get those apps for Instagram, right? Mm-hmm.. So that's what they're gonna say yes to. If Michael sold his thing, like, you just need to get healthy, like nobody's gonna buy it, right? We're gonna buy because we wanna look, we wanna slay at the wedding, we wanna slay on Instagram, right? We have a photo shoot coming up, and then after that he could pitch me an ongoing program because I already trust him. Okay. Yeah, definitely. Does that make sense?

Uknown:

It does. Thank you so much for all

Shanee´ Moret:

your inputs. You're welcome. And thank you everyone for being in the room. Follow the speakers who have shared today. It's been such a valuable conversation. And I guess let's, uh, have a final kind of 2 cents from every speaker.

Jayce Grayye:

Uh, yeah, Shana, thank you again for, again, hosting these great events. I hope everybody got a lot of golden nuggets off of it. Uh, like Shana said, follow all the speakers that are on here. Uh, thank you so much for everybody. Uh, you and I myself learned a couple of things for everybody here. So thank you,

Shanee´ Moret:

Michael.

Michael Omeka:

Yeah, SHA thank you for hosting this. I am truly amazed at the insights and. Valuable lessons that you know is being shared here. And I am super glad to have,

Shanee´ Moret:

uh, contributed. Awesome. Tamao

Tomaso Veneroso, M.S., M.I.A., Ph.D.(c):

sha uh, thank you so much. As always, always amazed on your capability and your skill. I know you as a professional, it's amazing. Uh, you're really talented, everything you do. So, uh, congratulations on that. As usual. Great topic. I learned a lot also, and ultimately, maybe one message one 2 cents is that at the end of the game, it seems that the common denominator of all these meetings and all these round tables you're organizing is really loving what you do. So, uh, if you love what you do, art and soul, and yes, there are a gazillion of setbacks, uh, but, uh, if you ultimately love what you do, when you have a vision and you like the. Uh, more than the an, uh, per se, uh, or more, more you like, more the an than the kill, per se, in a kind of, uh, uh, lion and analogy and what have you. Uh, definitely if you have a vision and a long term project and, uh, it's, uh, you put all your art and soul and, uh, heart and, uh, it's about passion. Uh, so I think that all of us have learned a lot today from all different kind of industry. It's awesome. And, uh, it's about working out every day because there are more feedbacks than anything else. But then at the end, the final price is what it matters.

Shanee´ Moret:

I love that. Thank you Tomaso for being here. We need you here more. Um, I love it. Sean Car. Yeah. When I, when

Shankar Poncelet:

I speak to a prospect, I really like to get very excited about their success. Sometimes more excited than they are themselves, because I can see it for them. I can see their success that they can see. Yet, and I'm just really letting that energy shine through. I also make them hear audibly that I understand what their underlying reason, what their why is, right? If you, if they talk to you and they see, he gets my why and I haven't even told him yet, that is usually a 95% chance to convert.

Shanee´ Moret:

I love it. And the next room for everyone listening, I'm about to create it, but it'll be Friday, it'll be probably at the same time as this meeting or maybe earlier. I haven't decided yet. But obviously content is a need, right? So we're gonna focus on content marketing, um, because for many of you, that can be the first step for pre-qualifying that potential client, for reaching more people. And you already have all the tools that you need. You just need to know exactly what to do with it, right? You have a phone, as long as you have a phone, you have enough to start creating content, uh, a phone in yourself, right? So, uh, I just wanna say thank you for being in the room. Follow all the speakers. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to teach and to just have this conversation. Uh, and God bless you. Have a beautiful Thanksgiving and I'll probably. Maybe we'll host a room tomorrow. We'll see. But have a beautiful Thanksgiving. Spend time with your family and God bless you chow.